Thursday, March 29, 2007

Tampon And Stamp

Stamp - Tapon

Tampon or stamp are different words in English, but here in Vietnam they have the same but different meanings which confused me when I looked at the sign of the shop. The sign made me wonder what tourists would think about what they actually sold. Funny!

Stamp - Tapon

I bought a stamp with Misa's name on it, hoping that I could get a story from the shop which I can share with you guys. I think getting your own name on a stamp is a good idea so that you can stamp it on a letter or postcard( maybe it's a silly idea for you). This is one of the traditional businesses in Vietnam. It would be a pity if the craft didn't survive as this particular man started his business after his father in1990. There are two shops with the same name because they are family, the staff are very young and as the owner said to me " this is not difficult to learn and make but you need to be patient and creative." The boy in his shop is doing well even though he only just started a year ago." They also make wooden moulds for making cakes which are really popular for Chinese and Vietnamese.

Stamp - Tapon

His shop has been reviewed by many magazines in and out of Viet Nam, and I think this kinf of craft is popular with the Japanese because I saw many Japanese coming to his shop for their own stamps and he also has so many samples available in Japanese. I asked him about his customers and he told me more Asian people are interested than western people.

Stamp - Tapon

One stamp costs 45,000Vnd, if you buy an ink box then you have to pay another 20,000Vnd and you can choose from hundreds of samples like flowers, animals... lots of cool stuff. It's a cute souvenir. I got one with a puppy on it for fun yesterday :)

13 comments:

junebee said...

Those are cool! Sort of like a chop.
Someone needs to start an Internet business because I would buy one!

But I had to laugh when I saw the signs, stamps and tampons in the same shop!

EmDao said...

oh thats so neat! I didn't know they use wooden mold,, I'm so used to the metal and plastic ones..lol

henno said...

That tampon/stamp thing is seriously funny!

Tim Rice said...

Sounds like a great craft! Fun!

Anonymous said...

You are correct in assuming that stamps are popular with the Japanese. Many still use stamps for signatures.

Anonymous said...

I think tampon must be some vestige of french colonialism. Tampon does indeed means stamp in french, but there's also ambiguity and people nowadays use the word ├ętampe instead.

trAcy said...

When I lived in Japan, I had one of these. It was called a Hanko and they made me leave it behind so they could sign closing documents for me after I had departed after my contract.

I wish I could have kept it. It was more legal than a regular signature and (10 years ago), you couldn't have a bank account or go to the doctor without the official way to sign your name.

If I make it to Vietnam ever, I'll buy more!

Anonymous said...

I juzz got back from Hanoi last Saturday... what i love the most, i eventually met this stamp maker 1/2 hour before my hotel van pick us up to airport, i manage to get mine 2 unit wth USD5 for two unit... i knew abt this after read your blog... then thks to you!

Godknows said...

I'm glad that you guys like this stuff. thanks for all your comments

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